Men and Depression

 

Depression is a serious but treatable medical condition — a brain disease — that can strike anyone, including men.  In America alone, more than 6 million men have depression each year.

Whether you’re a company executive, a construction worker, a writer, a police officer, or a student; whether you are rich or poor; surrounded by loved ones or alone; you are not immune to depression. Some factors, however, such as family history, undue stress, the loss of a loved one, or serious illnesses can make you more vulnerable.

If left untreated, depression can lead to personal, family, and financial difficulties. With appropriate diagnosis and treatment, however, most people recover. The darkness disappears, hope for the future returns, and energy and interest in life becomes stronger than ever.

Not everyone who is depressed experiences every symptom. Some people experience only a few symptoms; some people suffer many. The severity of symptoms varies among individuals and also over time. To read about the symptoms of depression and to hear what real men say about their experiences with them, click through the list below:

Depression is a treatable illness.  The majority of people with depressive disorders improve when they receive appropriate treatment. The first step to getting treatment is a physical examination by a doctor to rule out other possible causes for the symptoms. Next the doctor should conduct a diagnostic evaluation for depression or refer the patient to a mental health professional for this evaluation. Depending on the type of depression that you may be suffering, various treatments are available, including medication and psychotherapy

If these signs and symptoms describe you or a man that you care about, talk to your healthcare provider.  (Source – http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/men-and-depression/index.shtml)

For additional resources and information:

Fond du Lac area mental health providers – http://csifdl.org/counselor.html  and http://www.csifdl.org/sft638/accessingmhservicesbookdec132012.pdf

NAMI – http://www.nami-fdl.org/

Information – http://www.nmha.org/

 

 

 

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